Plenty of Jellyfish (and other science facts)

Seek a door that carries a [9] 

Zero Escape: Nine Hours, Nine Persons, Nine Doors

normallydistributed:


The first thought that pops into your head when you drop your daughter off for school and all the kids you pass are coughing without properly covering their mouths.

normallydistributed:

The first thought that pops into your head when you drop your daughter off for school and all the kids you pass are coughing without properly covering their mouths.

yuckfactor:

Gut bacteria are at it again! 
While scientists have long suspected that some gut bacteria curb food allergies (meaning killing these bacteria would be bad news), researchers have only recently uncovered which microbes helped or how they helped.
A research team at the University of Chicago conducted the study by treating some mice with antibiotics to wipe out gut bacteria, which in turn triggered an allergy-like response to peanut particles.
From the study, “Peanuts revved up the germ-free animals’ immune systems — but mice with normal gut bacteria didn’t have the bad reaction. Giving germ-free mice a dose of Clostridia bacteria made the animals more like their counterparts with normal gut flora. The microbes encourage mouse cells to make mucus that helps seal up the intestines, keeping food particles from slipping into the bloodstream and riling up the immune system, the researchers found.”
And this is not just good news for mice: humans also harbor this gut microbe - they just need some encouragement!
"Living cultures of bacteria in yogurt and other foods may help prevent or treat food allergies in people."

yuckfactor:

Gut bacteria are at it again! 

While scientists have long suspected that some gut bacteria curb food allergies (meaning killing these bacteria would be bad news), researchers have only recently uncovered which microbes helped or how they helped.

A research team at the University of Chicago conducted the study by treating some mice with antibiotics to wipe out gut bacteria, which in turn triggered an allergy-like response to peanut particles.

From the study, “Peanuts revved up the germ-free animals’ immune systems — but mice with normal gut bacteria didn’t have the bad reaction. Giving germ-free mice a dose of Clostridia bacteria made the animals more like their counterparts with normal gut flora. The microbes encourage mouse cells to make mucus that helps seal up the intestines, keeping food particles from slipping into the bloodstream and riling up the immune system, the researchers found.”

And this is not just good news for mice: humans also harbor this gut microbe - they just need some encouragement!

"Living cultures of bacteria in yogurt and other foods may help prevent or treat food allergies in people."

thegreenwolf:

cowgirlwisdom101:

thefreckledavantgardegoober:

mysticmisfit89:

Meanwhile, in prehistoric Canada…..

No no, you don’t understand, moose really do get that big. Take it from a Canadian. I’ve seen that bullshit in person. Scary as all heck.

I can second that statement!

Reminder that until several thousand years ago, megafauna were a LOT more common, to include in North America, and the moose is just a fair-to-middling sized species.

did-you-kno:

The piglet squid has curly tentacles at the top of its head, and its spotted coloring can make it look like it’s smiling at you. Source

did-you-kno:

The piglet squid has curly tentacles at the top of its head, and its spotted coloring can make it look like it’s smiling at you. Source

post-mitotic:

Naegleria fowleri, the brain-eating amoeba
this happy little guy is the causative agent of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a highly lethal brain infection transmitted through insufflation of stagnant fresh water — with a 95% case fatality rate, death typically occurs within five days of symptom onset
Naegleria accesses the brain through olfactory nerves, dissolving neural tissue into a hemorrhagic necrotic soup with its ironically smiley feeding structures (as seen above)
symptoms range from loss of smell and stiff neck to seizures, hallucinations, and respiratory failure from brain stem damage
it’s a microscopic horror story
credit: DT John and TB Cole, National Geographic

post-mitotic:

Naegleria fowleri, the brain-eating amoeba

this happy little guy is the causative agent of primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM), a highly lethal brain infection transmitted through insufflation of stagnant fresh water — with a 95% case fatality rate, death typically occurs within five days of symptom onset

Naegleria accesses the brain through olfactory nerves, dissolving neural tissue into a hemorrhagic necrotic soup with its ironically smiley feeding structures (as seen above)

symptoms range from loss of smell and stiff neck to seizures, hallucinations, and respiratory failure from brain stem damage

it’s a microscopic horror story

credit: DT John and TB Cole, National Geographic

intpmusings:

Sometimes I wonder whether I have any real intelligence or if I just have enough random bits of surface knowledge to bullshit my way through most things.

did-you-kno:

An Australian veterinarian performed a 45 minute surgery on a goldfish named George. His owners were “quite attached” to him, so they paid to have a tumor removed from his head. Source

did-you-kno:

An Australian veterinarian performed a 45 minute surgery on a goldfish named George. His owners were “quite attached” to him, so they paid to have a tumor removed from his head. Source

Do you know how Broad Review Seriess compares to Crash Course? In regards to Pathology specifically, but also in general.

You mean the textbook series, right? I’m sorry, I have actually never used either kinds ;; My profs usually make their textbooks available online for free, so I haven’t had to buy one recently. I will give you a shout if I see one at the store and library this week, though, since I have to go to them both.

Making it public in case somebody else knows.